Tuesday, 7 September 2010

I Hate Leaves



I have a hatred of hedges since my home is surrounded by those composed of beech and I have to cut/trim the things. The beech hedges round my home were possibly planted in the late 1800's with the thought, by the planter, that they'd never survive 50 years. These were the times when property had specific boundaries. Every year I try to keep the growth to around 2 metres, but it defeats me most of the time and I find it necessary to introduce those who understand the growth of these plants for hedges.

Modern day gardeners who plant beech hedges will always rue the day because, for only perhaps a couple of months a year (and I'm being liberal) leaves don't drop to excess. It's a nightmare these days to keep my access free of beech leaves but it's good exercise - although the daily removal of leaves from my property isn't on the healthly exercise list according to government guidelines. I should be out walking aimlessly or trudging the few miles to Tesco to buy my soon-to-be too expensive bottle of Tio Pepe.

I've now found the solution regarding my hedge problem - a tip from the Irish - although mine will be on a smaller scale and I've yet to find someone local to undertake the job.


18 comments:

Oldrightie said...

You need to tackle heavy trunk below the level you wish to maintain. Cutting leaf and small branches just stimulates more verdant and upward growth. Once you have your height and width tamed, life becomes a joy again!

Witterings From Witney said...

Re your efforts and the comment by Oldrightie - nothing like turning over a new leaf - or hedging your bets - or from a health aspect, keeping in trim. On the bright side, at least with your beech problem there is no sand to get in your shoes!

Can't at the moment think of any more Percy (thrower away) comments!

Joe Public said...

Could be worse SR................

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-11211538

cynicalHighlander said...

Try this one SB
http://www.perthshirebigtreecountry.co.uk/index.asp?pg=31

Dave H said...

Beech hedges aren't so much of a problem. Under compulsion I occasionally tackle various hedges round the place and the beech one is the least horrible. Ancient hedges are far more of a nightmare. Loads of species, all growing at different rates, together with thorns. Nothing but blood, sweat and tears in your skin.

subrosa said...

Thank you for the advice OR. Some years ago I did spend a fortune on a chain saw expert who cut the hedges down to a level which which would make them easy to manage, but as you say, since then they've grown several feet because hedge trimmers do just that - trim.

Think I'll need to cut them hard back again.

subrosa said...

Well done WfW!

subrosa said...

It could be worse indeed Joe. Isn't that horrific?

Sophia Pangloss said...

Ah sympathise Mrs Subrosa, a gairden can be sic a chore somedays, an a dinnae envy ye oot in aw weathers pickin up leaves.

But ah dae envy ye haein a gairden, wi gress an flooers an hedges. When ye bide up a stair ye miss aw that. Ye've got a bit o ootside land that ye can ca yer ain, an yer a lucky wumman fer it. An when things get hard, as they're bound tae dae, ye've got somewhaur tae graw yer tatties, an yer neeps, an yer ingins.

Ah wish ah had. Mynd, ah wid hae tae get a man in tae dae aw the heavy work...

subrosa said...

That's not far from me CH. They cut it every 7/8 years and need a crane to reach the top. The lower section is trimmed every year or it would grown across the main road.

subrosa said...

Leylandi is horrible too Dave but I dug mine out a few years ago. Beech is sharp and my hedges are ancient. Some of the trunks are 2 feet in diameter.

subrosa said...

Aye Sophia, I know I'm lucky having a garden. Didn't have one for many years and it's lovely to have a bit of outside space.

Yer right, I'll jist hae tae get a manny in. Problem is these days it's no' easy tae find a manny wi' the richt attitude tae hedges. :)

Tcheuchter said...

2 metres Madam; 2 METRES?!

I never expected to be reading that on this blog.

You have me reaching for the Laphroaig before noon.

subrosa said...

Aye all of 6 feet Tcheuchter, mainly because that's about as far as I can reach. ;)

Joe Public said...

Sophia

I've tried both Babelfish & Google Translate, but neither offer a Scots to proper-English translation.

In desperation, I found Mudcat Cafe, but not even that advises what an 'ingin' is.

http://www.mudcat.org/scots/display_all.cfm

subrosa said...

Super link Joe, haven't heard of that one before. Maybe someone could do a Dundeese translation service. Then again, maybe not.

Sophia Pangloss said...

Joe, if ye're haein bother wi ma screivins, this wee machine micht help ye http://scots-online.org/dictionary/search.htm

An ingin is yin o thae buld-fruits that Frenchmen yaised tae sell fae their bikes. Ah wid've thocht ye micht hae got that fae the context, fer context is aw...

subrosa said...

Another great link. Thanks Sophia.

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