Thursday, 2 July 2015

Police Criticise Scottish Government Policy


Police Scotland have now contributed to the Scottish Government’s ‘named person’ policy.  Their reason is that the new police set-up may not have the capacity or resources to cope with policing the plan which involves all under-18s.

They may have a subtext about their own organisation but their points about this policy are viable. 

Police Scotland warned that such a “significant change for all authorities including Police Scotland” could make it harder to identify at risk children.

At what point should police become involved and what will their powers entail?

Here’s a typical family scenario:

Prior to leaving for school child has an argument with his mother about the contents of his/her lunchbox. Mother put banana instead of cake.

Child comments to friends in classroom that his mother is ‘horrible and making me eat things I don’t like’. Teacher overhears the comment and immediately jumps on wee Jimmy as he’s made a comment which could be regarded as child abuse.  Wee Jimmy, delighted to be given such individual attention, exaggerates or even lies about his mother’s statement (as children are very prone to do).

Teacher goes to head of school who decides to telephone social work. SW in turn decide the police should become involved and before the family know it, wee Jimmy and his brothers and sisters become wards of court.

This type of scenario takes place is many family homes on a daily basis and the ‘named person’ policy gives the state the power to divide and destroy families.

Please sign the petition and tell as many of your friends about this because it must be stopped, otherwise the consequences will be horrific for all families living in Scotland.

source

Saturday, 27 June 2015

Saturday Smile



Couldn’t resist this one. Hope it makes you smile .

Wednesday, 24 June 2015

The Greece Fiasco



This could well be a crucial week for Greece.  You’ve probably read that sentence somewhere every week since the banking crisis of 2008.

I’ve never been to Greece. In the early 70s I organised a holiday there but it was cancelled for reasons beyond my control.  I’ve never had a desire to try again.

How often have we heard about Greece’s financial problems in the last few years?  It’s becoming boring and I’ve more or less given up reading about the country’s woes as the same protracted negotiations with the EU rumble on.

It appears the Greeks want to stay in Europe.  Little wonder really because if they returned to the drachma they would have to make all purchases in cash.  

Without a release of cash before 30 June, Greece would become the only developed country in history to default on the International Monetary Fund.

A family friend has just returned from a week’s holiday in Greece.  They were on the mainland but became acquainted with an Athenian couple who own two hotels in the Aegean Islands.  During the week the political problems of Greece were discussed and the Athenians were angry at their government’s proposal to increase the VAT on the islands. Profits would be greatly reduced and their intention was to sell their businesses if possible. That didn’t seem to concern them as they seldom kept an island business for more than a few years and when asked why, the answer was ‘It’s good to keep moving around’.  The horror of having to pay tax was too much for them to bear it seems.

What could possibly go wrong with the latest proposals for VAT on island businesses?  One of the major problems is that the Greeks do not pay tax so the cunning plan to ask them to pay massive new taxes is a non-starter.

Greece has never had a large enough GDP to service the interest on it’s €320bn debt, let alone any of the capital yet the ECB has continue to loan them billions.

I’ve no doubt by 30 June a suitable arrangement will be made with the ECB financiers and the people will once again be lulled into a false sense of security - until the next time their government can’t meet their creditors demands.  

It won’t be too long.

Tuesday, 16 June 2015

The African Continent’s Lost Generation


Last week HMS Bulwark was sent to the Mediterranean to rescue migrants from boats which had set sail from the African continent.  I use the words ‘set sail’ loosely as many of the photographs show that these vessels aren’t fit to sail around a pond, far less the open seas.

Now those rescued are protesting because they can’t gain entry to France at the Italian-French border.  The French have decided enough’s enough and closed the border and the migrants aren’t happy. The picture shows just how aware these migrants are of their rights.

In recent months several articles have stated these migrants are fleeing poverty or life threatening situations, but have a desire to reach Germany, Sweden or the UK.  Many have paid people traffickers up to £10,000 to reach the shores of Europe in the hope that the streets of these cities are paved with gold.  There must be gold in it somewhere for them because they keep coming.

It’s noticeable that most of the migrants are young, healthy men who will have left behind families in their own countries, therefore depriving their own country of a quickly diminishing male generation.

During a discussion with a German chap the other week about this migrant problem, he said it was a humanitarian one and the EU has to stand up to the plate and help these people.  I disagree.  What we’re doing is encouraging more and more people traffickers who now know they can herd numerous humans into anything that resembles a boat and point them north to Europe. They’re confident that as soon as the vessels leave the African continent then their clients will be rescued by Europeans and taken to the nearest European country, usually Italy.

If these migrants can afford to pay people traffickers, why can’t they afford to apply for entry via the official channels, instead of discarding their passports and pleading asylum?  

We’re a tolerant society but the migration issue is now uncontrollable, yet our political masters ignore it.

Almost one in three of England’s primary school children is from an ethnic minority and one in five speaks English as a second language.  When does the quest for diversity become stupidity?  It’s impossible for so many people to integrate successfully into live in the UK in a short space of time.

The Calais problem continues and I thank my lucky stars that I wasn’t on that coach. Where were the French police? The answer is nowhere, because France doesn’t want these people and are content to allow them to destroy transport businesses and put the average traveller in fear of their lives.

We need to deploy our army at our borders to show that criminal behaviour will not be tolerated.  We also need to introduce the Australian system which has discouraged migrants from attempting to enter that country by sea. 

Lastly, but by no means least, when these migrants enter Britain illegally they must be held in a secure area until they’re sent back to their country of origin.  Currently most are allowed bail if they’re charged with illegal entry. I’m informed that is the most difficult aspect of deportation because many lie and say they’re from war torn zones and checking their statements is an arduous, and sometimes unproductive, task.

The lefties won’t like this suggestion. Then again they give little thought to the countries which are losing a generation of young men.


Monday, 8 June 2015

Charles Kennedy




The premature sudden death of Charles Kennedy last week exposed the hypocrisy of many of his colleagues. Some of the most effusive remarks came from the mouths of those ‘colleagues' who were determined to remove him as leader of his party several years ago.  

By all accounts Charles Kennedy was a well respected politician who was treated very shabbily by some of his colleagues.  Although I’ve always thought the LibDem Lembit Öpik was rather foolish, his article in yesterday’s Mail on Sunday has more than a ring of truth about it.

Rest in Peace Mr Kennedy.

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